Day: June 14, 2017

FEARLESS MARINE | READY TO DIE FOR HIS COUNTRY

Posted on

36 PFC EDDIE C. CARDONA JR. PN(M) --

 

BEFORE IT STARTED

If Batman will fade into the dark, if Man of Steel himself debilitates of kryptonite and Wonder Woman is afraid of being in love then, Private First Class Eddie Carodona Jr. a fearless Marine who died in Marawi siege, somehow knew that he was going to die and yet, he’s ready for it.

Fourth in brood of seven, when he was young he wanted to be a law enforcer, known as a good brother, friendly and generous.

Eddie pursued his dream to protect his country. He studied at the Philippine College of Criminology in Manila. But in year 2012 he decided to join the Marines.

But behind every great man, stands a brave woman. Before he was assigned to Mindanao, Eddie visited the father of his girlfriend, who was working abroad, to ask for her hand in marriage. Because Eddie felt that they are destined to each other and he was so excited to give his “apelyido” surname to the woman he loves.

PREMONITIONS

It’s a gloomy day of 29th of May in Manila, Eddie was unusually happy when he met his 28-year-old brother, Ronel.

That day, he showered a variety of jokes. The jokes sounded as if Eddie was leaving for good. Or as Ronel puts it together, “something that he had not done in the past.”

Eddie said to his brother that they should take advantage of his short break to take a selfie together. Saying it might be their last time together.

Before leaving for Marawi, Eddie washed all his clothes kept in his barracks in Fort Bonifacio and left his ATM card with his friend for his relatives. Showing that he really knew that he was going to die giving his ATM card for financial aspects for his beloved family.

During the fighting, Eddie texted his brother Ronel and their relatives telling them that they should call him now because they might not be able to call him again.

Ronel remembered sending Eddie a message asking him about his situation in the morning of June 09 but his brother failed to reply.

Eddie had also told him in earlier message that gunfire would not stop and that they had no chance to sleep.

Who would’ve thought that after that day, his brother will be sleeping forever?

THE DAY IT HAPPENED

Ronel revealed that he learned about his brother’s death on June 10 when the wife of another killed Marine soldier posted the photographs of those killed in Marawi siege on social media.

At first, they thought it was not Eddie. In denial. But when reality hit them, they finally realized that it was really Eddie.

Then a military officer called them that afternoon to confirm that Eddie was one of the 13 Marine Soldiers who were killed in the battle to retake Marawi City from the Islamic State- allied Maute terror group.

It may have burned down a deep hole in their hearts. In reality, losing a love one was never easy. A ton of pain and agony pushes you down that they just can’t find the way to move forward or forget. But Eddie’s family know for a fact that he died because he fought for his country.

Everyone looks up for a hero, everyone needs a hero. And a hero does not need to have extraordinary superpowers or capes… But those heroes who are just always there, these are people who are just as normal as we look like, but we always don’t have the time to take notice.

These kind of people needs to remember not just because they offered their time to protect our country but because their love, patriotism and loyalty are worth to remember.

A different kind of Bayot

Posted on Updated on

49 PFC DHAN RYAN A. BAYOT (INF) PA --

“Just bomb my location, Sir!”

These were the last words of 24-year old Private First Class Dhan Ryan Bayot when he called his commanding officer before he succumbed to death in the hands of the Maute-ISIS terrorists.

Bayot’s team–consisting of 9 soldiers from the 51st Infantry Batallion—was stationed in a detachment in Barangay Lilod, Marawi City on the 2nd day of the Marawi siege, May 24. They were dispatched to the said post upon the request of a town mayor for added security as his residence was just above the detachment.

Moments later, they were attacked. A survivor said that aside from the shots from both sides of the road, gunfire also came from above. Apparently, the official’s house was already overtaken by the terrorists. The soldiers were too surprised that the volley of fire came from all directions.

Not long enough, five of his companions were dead. For some reason, three soldiers managed to escape and abandoned the post. (It was only learned later that the three were shot just the same, killing one and wounding the two).

Now alone and with nary a scratch, he radioed his commanding officer for reinforcement but no one came. A few hours later, he called again. The commanding officer told him that reinforcements attempted twice, but they couldn’t get through as the only passage to him was heavily entrenched by the enemies.

This time, sensing that death was more imminent than being rescued, he then gave his coordinates, and requested his commander to bomb his location so the enemies surrounding him will get hit too. “Bombahin nalang ninyo ang location ko Sir!,”(Just bomb my location Sir!) he told his commanding officer.

His dead body and of six of his comrades were retrieved on May 28—four days after they were killed.

One of those who retrieved his dead body was his father, Sgt. Larry Bayot of the Division Reconnaissance Company of the 1st Infantry Division. His father said that it took four units from different battalions of the Philippine Army to retrieve their bodies given the difficult terrain. He understands now why it was really hard to rescue his son.

Surprisingly, the father saw no bullet wounds on his son’s body that might have caused his death. Instead, he saw his son’s heavily deformed face and a deep bolo cut around his neck. Presumably, when he ran out of bullets the terrorists might have taken turns of bashing his face before slashing his neck in an attempt to behead him.

Although pained so much for the dastardly manner of his son’s death, the father never showed it. To a soldier, it’s always a ‘do-or-die-but never-question-why’ attitude.

The next day, the father brought his son’s body to bury him in the family’s hometown in Barangay Upper Pangi, Ipil, Zamboanga Sibugay. On June 2, a day after the burial, President Rodrigo Duterte went to his barangay to personally console him on his loss.

The president gave him the posthumous medal for his son, P250 thousand cash, and a pledge to fund for any young surviving family member’s education.

“Unsa pa man akong matabang nimo?” (What else do you need that I can be of help?) the President asked Sergeant Bayot. Bayot replied that his 18 year-old youngest son, who is the late PFC Ryan’s younger brother, wants to join the Army too. Maybe you can help him enlist in the army, Bayot told the president.

“No, not yet, he has to finish his college first, then after that maybe we can let him enter the army or even the police,” said Duterte.

The sergeant relented to his commander-in-chief.

Now, he is busy preparing the documents of his dead son while waiting to be called anytime for duty to the 1st Infantry Division whose jurisdiction includes Marawi City. His younger children will be off to college.

Ironically, the word bayot in Visayan means gay or coward. But for this particular family and for the neighbors who know them in Upper Pangi, Ipil, the word simply means ‘valor and patriotism’.

 

Story via: fb.com/SibEx

Salute to the Heroes of Marawi

Posted on

gallantmen 58

We mourn for the death of our soldiers who died fighting in the quest of peace. Their ultimate sacrifice will not bring us to pieces, instead, motivate us to continuously do our mandate of securing the people from all threats to the last drop of our blood.

We call on to the peace-loving Filipinos to continue praying and supporting our communities, our government and our troops as we continue to win peace in our midst.

We will be forever grateful to our soldiers who have offered their lives in the service of our nation. We grieve with all the families who have lost a loved one in [these] ongoing armed hostilities.

fb.com/CivilRelationsServiceAFP